*Week 18 – Movie Recommendations from #ADAF

Volcano (Rúnar Rúnarsson, 2011)

This movie was a mystery in my life! I saw this film in a festival in 2011, along with a couple of other films that day, but I remember this one very accurately in my mind. I was very impressed by the premise of “Volcano.” It tells the story of a 67-year-old man named Hannes and his wife Anna, who live in Reykjavik, Iceland. Hannes retires from his long-time job as a janitor and finds himself in a new situation. One day, Anne has a stroke and Hannes attempts to care for her at home as she wishes. And this is where the mystery comes in. Later that year,  I watched Michael Haneke’s “Amour,” and the story is very similar to “Volcano.” I knew that “Volcano” was written by Rúnar Rúnarsson, and “Amour” was written by Michael Haneke. We all know that there are similar stories in cinema, but this one has notable similarities. Same plot, same climactic moments, same same same. Even the characters’ names are similar (“Anna” in Volcano, “Anne” in Amour). For a long time, I googled about this and nobody was mentioning about this awkwardness. Later, I saw that a couple of blog writers have written about it. Anyway, honestly, I love both. If you have seen “Amour” before, I would definitely suggest that you see “Volcano.” If you haven’t seen “Amour,” see both. It is a very humane, reflective and emotional movie (they both are).

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Merve Tekin

In the Loop (Armando Iannucci, 2009)

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A political satire about high-level American and British operatives attempting to prevent a war between between two Middle Eastern countries.

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If you get a kick out of talky movies, where every scene must take at least three to five screenplay pages filled with dialogue lines, then this one’s for you, frendo! “In the Loop” is a scathingly funny political satire, infested with clever word play, characters constantly interrupting each other, and read-between-the-lines gags. I’ve been meaning to watch this movie again for years now. It’s the kind of movie that almost requires a second viewing. It’s hard to overstate how good the dialogue is in “In the Loop.” It doesn’t hold back; it’s the kind that may make Tarantino or Aaron Sorkin blush (them’s fightin’ words). This period in American history, the time we’re living in now, might just be the perfect climate for this kind of movie. The political and global climate portrayed in “In the Loop” would be absolutely terrifying if it weren’t so damn funny.

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Be on the lookout for Iannucci’s first movie in 8 years, “Death of Stalin,” which comes out this year.

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Jeremy Yonzon

Almost Famous (Cameron Crowe, 2000)

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“A high-school boy is given the chance to write a story for Rolling Stone Magazine about an up-and-coming rock band as he accompanies them on their concert tour.”

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Cameron Crowe’s timeless film is set in the ’70’s and based on his real life story back when he was a 15 year-old journalist for Rolling Stone. Billy Crudup plays the rock star and Kate Hudson plays a groupie who falls in love with the rock star. Everything about this movie is just perfect – acting, story, directing but we can’t forget the amazing soundtrack and the scene in the bus that features Elton John’s ‘Tiny Dancer,’ which may be the real star of the film! If you want to go back to ’70’s, this is the right movie for you.

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Merve Tekin

Jackie Brown (Quentin Tarantino, 1997)

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A middle-aged airline stewardess (Pam Grier) finds herself in the middle of a complicated scheme that will either make her a large profit or cost her life.

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Quentin Tarantino is one of the most talked about movie directors in the world and I have it on good authority to say that “Jackie Brown” is his least talked about movie (and probably the least seen). It stands out from the rest of his filmography in that it’s Tarantino’s only script that was adapted from another source. That’s most likely why it doesn’t feel 100% Tarantino-esque. “Jackie Brown” may be not have the replay-value of his other movies and may seem milder, but that shouldn’t be the reason why people should avoid watching it for the first time. And actually, it’s the reason why I decided to plug it for today’s adaf post!

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Jeremy Yonzon

The Young Offenders (Peter Foott, 2016)

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It is St. Patrick’s Day tomorrow, so I would like to share a great film that I watched recently called “The Young Offenders.” This film is inspired by the true event of Ireland’s biggest cocaine seizure in 2007 that was worth 440 million euros. The two main characters are Conor and Jock, two teenaged inner city boys from Cork who dress and act the same. Jock is a legendary bike thief who runs away from a bike obsessed police Sergeant. These two boys cycle 160km to find missing cocaine bales each worth 7 million euros. This film is hilariously fun. I absolutely loved the style of the director. The two main actors are brilliant and very believable. I would strongly recommend this one.

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Merve Tekin

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (Werner Herzog, 2009)

A corrupt, drug-addled detective (Nicolas Cage) investigates the homicide of a Senegalese family in post-Katrina New Orleans while wrestling with the ramifications of his unorthodox policing methods.

This movie looks like a train wreck on paper: it’s a reimagining of the NC17-rated 1992 original, “Bad Lieutenant,” replacing Harvey Keitel with Nicolas “not the bees!” Cage, and needlessly running with a laughably long title. And on top of all that, Werner Herzog, Mother Nature’s mystical guru of documentary filmmaking, was inexplicably chosen to direct a cop movie? It sounds like the recipe for disaster, but I’m actually here to recommend it you! Pay no mind to what I just laid out because I’ll be the first to admit that I was pleasantly surprised to find out how wrong I was! “Port of Call” deviates in tone from the 1992 original, which may cause its fans to shake their heads, but the remake achieves what it sets out to do, artistically and narratively. Nicolas Cage, famous for his over-the-top acting, is almost too perfect for the title role of the drug-addled, not so by-the-book, and just flat-out immoral police detective hell-bent on solving the homicide of an entire family. His incessant intoxicated state is expressed on screen through scenes that straddle reality and fantasy, the indelible mark of Herzog’s otherworldly approach to worldly things. My personal take on “Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans,” taking into consideration its low-ish IMDB rating, is that it’s simply misunderstood. It comes across as a weird cop movie, but I see its greatness in its ability to take the old tropes of the “corrupt cop,” add some flour and Werner Herzog’s own brand of seasoning, shake’em up, fry’em up, and end up with a movie that’s remarkably delicious as soul food. Borrowing from a very memorable scene, I’ll conclude, “Its soul’s still dancing.”

@anotherdayanotherfilm Recommended by Jeremy Yonzon

PLEASE SHARE YOUR RECOMMENDATION!!!

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